Philosophy Courses

Foundations of Moral Behavior I (Ethics 201) Credit recommendation: 3  lower division credits in Ethics or Philosophy Objectives: Students will be able to: demonstrate in-depth understanding of Jewish ethics as presented in the Mishna of Pirkei Avos and its commentaries; explain how ethical behavior is derived from the words of the sages; analyze the axioms of the sages; explain underlying premises that build the foundation of the Jewish ethical system; identify the sources that the sages base their axioms; and apply those axioms to practical situations. Instruction:The Ethics 201 examination will asses students’ knowledge of the major theories of Jewish ethical behavior, their sources, underlying premises; and how those theories are applied to Jewish law and practice. Specific topics include: free will and determinism; meaning of “good” and “evil”; morality and justice; moral sentiments and obligations towards God and others; individual responsibility; and other topics.

Foundations of Moral Behavior II (Ethics 202) Credit recommendation: 3 semester hours 3  lower division credits in Ethics or Philosophy Objectives: Students will be able to: demonstrate in-depth understanding of Jewish ethics as presented in the Mishna of Pirkei Avos and its commentaries; explain how ethical behavior is derived from the words of the sages; analyze the axioms of the sages; explain underlying premises that build the foundation of the Jewish ethical system; identify the sources that the sages base their axioms; and apply those axioms to practical situations. Instruction: The Ethics 202 examination will asses students’ knowledge of the major theories of Jewish ethical behavior, their sources, underlying premises; and how those theories are applied to Jewish law and practice. Specific topics include: performance of the commandments; guarding the commandments; giving rebuke; the meaning of “good” and “evil”; morality and justice; acts of kindness and charity; repentance; and other topics.

Ethics of Communication I (Ethics 310/310 DL) Credit recommendation: Note: For the proficiency examination: in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ethics or Philosophy (2/11) and for the distance learning course: in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ethics or Philosophy Objectives: Students will be able to: demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the ethical and moral issues involved in communication; identify and discuss the sources, underpinnings, and conclusions that dictate ethical communication in interpersonal relationships; use their theoretical knowledge to assess types of language and situations to determine appropriate ethical responses for all involved parties. Instruction: The Ethics 310 examination and distance learning course explore the ethical, philosophical, and practical issues involved in interpersonal communications. Topics include: libel; slander; rebuke; innuendo; the Biblical sources for ethical communication; the problem of listening to disparaging speech; repercussions for unethical speech; speaking about others in the workplace; speaking in front of a person; speaking behind a person’s back; and other topics. The distance learning course is delivered through a series of 40 video lectures.

Ethics of Communication II (Ethics 320) Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ethics or Philosophy Objectives: Students will be able to: demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the ethical and moral issues involved in communication; identify and discuss sources, conceptual underpinnings, and conclusions that dictate ethical communication in interpersonal relationships; use their theoretical knowledge to assess language and situations to determine the appropriate ethical response for all involved parties. Instruction: The Ethics 320 examination is designed to assess students’ ability to express knowledge of ethical and philosophical issues involved in interpersonal communications. Topics include: gossip; white lies; libel; slander; rebuke; deprecating speech for positive purposes; quitting a job; and common situations.

Principles of Moral Development I (Philosophy 310/310 DL) Credit recommendation: NOTE: For the proficiency examination: in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ethics or Philosophy (2/11) and for the distance learning course: in the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ethics or Philosophy Objectives: Students will be able to: express a comprehension of the Jewish principles related to the man’s duty in this world; describe various aspects of the virtues of vigilance, alacrity, and cleanliness; identify and discuss causes of their constraints and explain the method for acquiring them; clearly explain the philosophical concepts discussed and extrapolate and apply these ideas to other areas and reconstruct the proofs articulated in the text. Instruction: The Philosophy 310 examination and 310 DL (distance learning) course examine problems facing mankind on an individual and collective level; discuss solutions offered by the Jewish system of moral development. Topics include: human nature; man’s potential; purpose of mankind; duty; individual and collective responsibility; theories and methods of moral development. The distance learning course will follow a series of 40 audio lectures.

Principles of Moral Development II (Philosophy 320) Credit recommendation: In the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ethics or Philosophy Objectives: Students will be able to: explain the Jewish principles related to abstinence, purity, piety, humility, fear of sin, and holiness; identify and discuss the causes of their constraints and formulate methods used for acquiring them; clearly explain the philosophical concepts of morality; extrapolate and apply these concepts to other areas; and reconstruct the proofs articulated in the texts. Instruction: The Philosophy 320 examination will assess students’ ability to express in-depth knowledge of the Jewish philosophy of moral development. Topics include asceticism; pleasure; compassion; purity; piety; the holy man; and humility.

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